Volkswagen’s Car-Net gives owners additional peace of mind with three new features

Volkswagen Car-Net® Security & Service1 has always been there for you.  From sending destinations directly to your compatible navigation system, obtaining Vehicle Health Reports, Remote Vehicle Access, Guardian Alerts,2 or safety features like Automatic Crash Notification (ACN),3 Emergency Call,3 and Roadside Assistance,4 it’s a great way to help you stay connected when you are on the move. And now, the VW Car-Net app has added three new valuable Security and Service features that only strengthens the relationship between you and your VW. The first new feature is Curfew Alert,2 great for parents with teen drivers. Simply turn on the Curfew alert and you will be notified anytime your vehicle is driven – giving you added peace of mind knowing if your teenage driver is taking the car without permission. Next is Valet Alert,2 which provides you added confidence when valeting your vehicle. Once the alert is turned on, you will be notified if your Car-Net equipped VW moves more than 0.2 miles from your location. Both alerts can be sent by text, email or both, and easily turned on or turned off in the Vehicle Options menu in the Car-Net app. The third new feature, Parking Information powered by Parkopedia, can help make your lives easier by providing off-street parking information.5 You can find available parking locations either near you or a point of interest. Once you click on a specific location, the address, hours of operation and pricing will populate. Users can also send the location to their car’s navigation system, if so equipped, by tapping the “Send to My VW” button. VW Car-Net Security & Service is available on select models/trims. Please consult your dealer or VW.com/carnet to learn more. New vehicle owners can subscribe to the Car-Net trial at the dealership at the time of purchase or by pressing the i-Button in the overhead console and speak with a representative. To get information on subscription prices after trial, call (877) 820-2290 or go to vw.com/carnet.

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A Volkswagen for Everyone

Change might mean just figuring out how the right size VW works better for your life — for example, how a cargo carrier could help you on those summer camping trips. And change might also mean figuring out what upsized VW is better for your life — to add that extra grocery-carrying space or third row for the soccer team. Discover the adaptable add-ons and new models that fit the you of today — and tomorrow. Upsize: Atlas A Great Fit for the Extenda-Family You’ve hit that point in your family life in which the kids much prefer travelling in packs — or pairs— and you prefer carpooling, too. The Atlas lets you all ride like kings and queens, not sardines, with three super-roomy fold-down rows, four USB ports, 17 cupholders, and available Driver Assistance1 features for on-the-road help amid the giggliest car pools. Add a Cargo Box Carrier,2 and packing up for the annual holiday road trip will be a piece of cake. Right Size: Tiguan Adapt for Urban Adventure Seekers You’ve successfully tested the capacity of your Tiguan with all things off-road. That 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine with a transport accessory2 is perfect for skis, mountain bikes, or whatever your personal adrenaline rush needs to make its heart content. Your new passion? Exploring your urban environs with vintage furniture scores, multi-couple date nights, and bags and gear for weekend escapes. VW DriverGear or Accessories: They can help solve all your driving and storage conundrums (and make you look cool). Even better? The Genuine Volkswagen Accessories Warranty offers coverage for 12 months or 12,000 miles, whichever occurs first.3 To find more ideas and get your favorite items, click here. Right Size: Alltrack or SportWagen The Road Less Traveled Is Always Good You got the Alltrack or SportWagen because you knew it could keep up with your adventurous streak. That doesn’t have to change now that out-of-town soccer tournaments are as likely as backroad escapes. (And you’ll enjoy both thanks to the 4MOTION® all-wheel drive, which comes standard on the Alltrack and is available on the SportWagen. It can send torque to the rear axle just when you need it.) To make sure you can take advantage of non-soccer weekends, add base carrier bars and a bike or kayak holder attachment2 — enjoy the evolution. Right Size: Passat More Space for the Family on the Move The sheer volume of kids’ stuff seems to grow right along with them, leading you to yearn for a little more room. Your Passat has the dedicated space — with more than three feet of rear legroom — for weeklong vacations, holidays at the grandparents, or all those super-size groceries. Upsize: Jetta Superior Sound for the Independent Go-Getter A redesign and a teched-out interior in the all-new 2019 Jetta may force your friends into a serious case of VW envy. And with some of the vehicle’s features, who wouldn’t feel that way? Take the available BeatsAudio for example. It’s described as “sound you can feel” for a reason. It may net you the title of DFD (the designated festival driver). Upsize: Golf or Golf GTI Because You Just Love to Drive You know that driving is more than just getting from point A to point B. That’s why the Golf or Golf GTI —  in all its customizable glory — is your urban spirit vehicle. Whether you’re toting the week’s groceries or simply out to enjoy the road, the unmistakable profile of either hatch turns heads. Perfection. Upsize: Arteon An Artful Approach for the Style Connoisseur Do you find inspiration is everywhere, from gallery walls to well-crafted meals? Then add the all-new Arteon — with a classic fastback design as your style statement — to your driveway. It’s like a navigable work of art, with both design and substance (hello, turbocharged engine with an 8-speed automatic transmission) on display. It makes art openings and grocery runs equally sublime. Available this fall.

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Meet Noor Tagouri, the next generation of storyteller

Anyone who spends time on social media may think the only storytellers that flourish there are the ones with their phones permanently set to selfie mode. To see the opposite, meet Noor Tagouri. The 24-year-old has followed her own path that straddles the worlds of journalism, fashion and activism, from shooting her own documentaries to starting a clothing line that benefits charitable causes. “I knew I wanted to be a storyteller, a journalist, before I knew what that meant,” Tagouri says.  “My intention was to connect with people and get them to open up, and to create an experience where people realize they’re not alone.” A native of the D.C. area, Tagouri entered college at 16, and has since worked in newspaper, radio and digital media. As a practicing Muslim who wears a hijab daily, Tagouri says she tries to build trust through empathy with people who feel the world doesn’t understand their lives. “I realized that the misrepresentation of my community was so detrimental and harmful to our community,” she says. “I always approach stories by asking ‘How is the way I’m covering this going to affect the community?'” As a social media personality with hundreds of thousands of followers, Tagouri’s very presence and style often makes a statement, for both fans and the occasional critic. Tagouri says the hijab is “more of a reminder to live for something that bigger than myself, to focus on my voice. “I have this strong sense of identity. [The hijab] is a reminder of humility, and that not everything is about you — the story is always bigger than you.” Last month, Volkswagen supported Tagouri’s fashion project, The Noor Effect. Created in collaboration with Lisn Up Clothing, the line features a striking graphic of the word “girl,” reversed and crossed out — a reference to a quote by a well-known artist: “I cross out words so you will see them more.” “Fashion is always something I really loved and appreciated,” says Noor.  “Adam Khafif from Lisn Up had reached out to me to collaborate, and he donates half his profits from each piece to charity. It’s heavily rooted in philanthropy and giving back, and that’s something I care about.” Up next for Tagouri: a podcast drawn from her documentary reporting, potentially more fashion efforts, and keeping up the drive to find stories worth sharing. “If you’re not doing something that feels good, helping those that come later…you might feel a sense of being lost.”

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The VW Bucket List: Highway 1 Treffen

To gather, to meet: In Germany it’s known as treffen, but in the U.S. treffen has a slightly different meaning. Here, it refers to the Highway 1 Treffen, a yearly trek that owners of air-cooled VWs make from the Canadian to the Mexican border on Highway 1. Along the way, those 1,000 or so drivers — some who join for a day, some who make the whole journey — reunite with old friends, meet fellow VW enthusiasts, and generally enjoy all that the coast has to offer. “We all want to drive our Volkswagens up and down the coast,” says Andre Toselli of Airhead Parts, which created and has sponsored the Treffen for the past 20 years. “This is an opportunity to do it with hundreds of your new best friends.” Here’s why the Highway 1 Treffen should be on your bucket list: Anyone can participate, but the actual drive of Treffen is reserved for air-cooled Volkswagens, making the event pure eye candy for lovers of vintage buses, Beetles, and Karmann Ghias. “Some of these cars deserve to be in museums, but the best part is, they’re not,” says Toselli. “People are driving them, they’re enjoying them, and they’re sharing them with other people.” Part of the draw of the Treffen is the chance to spend time with people who share an enthusiasm for Volkswagen vehicles. “The camaraderie is just amazing,” says Mike Anderson, who has driven his 1961 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible in portions of previous Treffens — and plans to complete the entire drive this year. Many drivers have owned a series of VW vehicles over the years — and drive other models such as a Jetta or Passat when they’re not cruising in their classic cars. “Whenever you get a bunch of like-minded people together, you have a lot of fun,” says Tom Summers, who has driven his 1962 bus during portions of multiple Treffens. “If you want to meet people and bring good vibes, there’s nothing better than to be in a VW Beetle or a bus.” Participants drive about 150 miles a day, winding their way through iconic settings such as the California redwoods. “It’s a beautiful drive,” says Anderson. “You’re next to the ocean, you’re not going fast, the cars are all in a convoy.” Drivers participate in car shows at several stops and may camp in their buses or stay in the same hotels at night. There are events that drivers in Treffen gather around as well as spontaneous happenings, such as a local parade of vehicles. “You’ve got retired couples, you’ve got young couples with kids in car seats,” says Toselli. “Everyone gets along like they’ve known each other their whole lives.”   Jason Chenoweth drove his 1965 Bahama blue Beetle to the Treffen stop in Pacific Grove, California, near his residence. Later, he spotted a drawing of his car at the event on social media. He contacted the artist and bought a print, which now sits on his desk. “It was shocking,” Chenoweth recalls. “I said, ‘Holy cow, that’s my bug!’” Some Canadian drivers make the trip, and Mexican car clubs drive up to meet the Treffen at the border and join in the fun at the end of the cruise. One year, Toselli says, a man shipped his bus from the Netherlands to participate. Another time, an Australian couple bought a vintage bus in Alaska, drove to the U.S. with their nine-month-old baby, completed the Treffen, and then kept on going until they reached Costa Rica.   It can be a challenge to keep a cavalcade of decades-old vehicles humming along for 1,700 miles, but usually a VW auto mechanic travels with the group to help with repairs. Either way, the Treffen is filled with people whose chief hobby is fixing up classic Volkswagen vehicles. “If something happens, you have all the help in the world,” says Anderson. “Things break, but we have parts available,” says Summers. “That’s all part of the adventure.” Although the air-cooled VW is the primary focus of the Treffen gathering, anyone is welcome — the curious, the locals, the car fans. There’s no admission charge, no ticket necessary, so just follow the crowd and get ready to amp up your knowledge of all things VW.   of

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6 Standout Summer Travel Ideas

Pick a trail, any trail Spending time outdoors doesn’t have to include booking an overnight stay. Use the National Recreation Trails database from American Trails to find hiking or cycling spots within driving distance. Water and snacks are, of course, a must-have. Bonus: When you start road trips with very young children, they learn how to navigate time in the car. That’s what parenting blogger Stephanie Loomis Pappas discovered. “When [our son] was first born, we didn’t have a choice about road tripping: It was either pile in the car for 10 hours or not see his grandparents,” she says. “Before he reached his first birthday, we’d already logged thousands of miles with him in the car.” Tip: Packing a day-trip cooler, weekend-away tent, and camping supplies? Fold down the second-row seats in your Golf Alltrack for even more space. Enjoy a national park Whether you’re driving cross-country to Yellowstone or just driving across town, you’ll probably be able to find a national park: There are 417 sites (at least one in every state and in the U.S. territories) totaling 84 million acres. A good way to plan a visit is to use the National Park Service directory. Have a child age 15 or younger? They get free entrance all year; for everyone else, check out the list of fee-free days each year. Tip: Taking the scenic route to get there? Use the available driving mode selector, which includes an Off-Road Driving Mode and Hill Descent Control.1 Try camping (or glamping) Sometimes the perfect weekend means packing a tent, sunscreen, and s’more supplies and jetting off before the traffic hits. Not ready to go sans electricity? Look for “glamping” setups, outfitted with hotel-like amenities out in the wilderness. And listen to your kids’ perspective on travel — you might be surprised how they view the scenery. “My absolute favorite part of traveling with my family is seeing a destination through my son’s eyes,” Stephanie says. “I might be focusing on the drive down a twisty wooded road, but my son is laughing and asking, ‘Who wants to hide a driveway?’ every time we pass a Hidden Driveway sign.” Tip: Navigating directions to your camp (or glamp) site can be tricky with a map alone. Available VW Car-Net® Guide & Inform2 can help with enhanced navigation for traffic, weather information, and more. Seek out some music Small and big music festivals abound for every genre, from country to rock to electronic and all tunes in between. Many festivals have an app so you can navigate the ins and outs of parking, admission (children are often free), and carry-ins such as your own snacks. Tip: Savor the journey by taking turns as a family (even the littles get a turn!) picking podcasts, audio books, or songs to play through Car-Net® App-Connect.3 (That’s just one of Stephanie’s strategies to maintain the fun on the road.) Use that captive time in the car to learn (or sing) something new. Plan a city retreat There’s no such thing as knowing too much about a new destination. Check out child-friendly atlases (no pun intended) and city guides from the library so kids can think about what they want to see — and make it part of your itinerary. Ask your library if it has a toy rental program that includes a collection of travel packs specifically designed for road trips. “Our last travel toy bag included a [toy] license plate game, a pair of binoculars, a kaleidoscope, and magnetic games,” she says. Tip: Use available features like Park Distance Control with Maneuver Braking4 to help you navigate in (or out of) tricky city parking spots. Book a beach (or lakeside) escape When the weather warms up, water fun is (nearly) mandatory, but you don’t need to be oceanside to get wet. Try a new-to-you pool or check out local adventure outfitters for activities such as tube floats down area rivers. One idea to break up longer journeys where water fun is the final destination: Plan mini breaks and give kids first dibs on a stop. On a trip to New York City, the Pappas’ son picked a candy store to check out. “Knowing that he had that stop to look forward to earned us goodwill during unexpected traffic on our trip,” she says. Tip: Make transporting gear such as kayaks and bikes easier with a rooftop rack — or add even more space for “necessities”  (water bottles, games, rain gear, pet toys, and more) with a cargo organizer.5   

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A VW Electric Vehicle Races to a History-Making Win

On June 24, race car driver Romain Dumas took the all-electric VW I.D. R to over 14,000 feet above sea level in record-breaking time, capturing not only the win at The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in Colorado but setting a course record by a full 16 seconds. It was an apt victory, given how Dumas felt the first time he floored the I.D. R’s accelerator:  “I thought I was sitting in a rocket.” Dumas and the I.D. R defeated not only the previous EV record but every conventionally powered race car that took on the course, too. It took Dumas and the VW just 7 minutes and 57.148 seconds to rocket through 12.42 miles up the hairpin turns and elevation gain to the finish line. Known as the Race to the Clouds, the Pikes Peak event has been the venue of choice for testing new automotive technology since 1916. It’s not for nothing that it’s known as one of the most grueling and thrilling motoring events in the world: There’s the altitude (the finish line is 14,110 feet above sea level), steep grades (an average of 7 percent), and the twisting route (156 curves) to challenge both cars and drivers. Dumas’ goal was always to win, of course, and the 2018 race brought him his fourth victory at Pikes Peak. Luckily, the I.D. R was built to tackle the challenge — as its record-breaking performance demonstrates. Advanced Tech on the Mountain The I.D. R combines speed and power, and its résumé shows that. Under the hood is 680 hp and 479 lb.-ft. of torque provided by two electric motors. This allows the I.D. R to go from 0 to 100km/hr (roughly 62 mph) in approximately 2.25 seconds, depending on grip level — faster than a Formula 1 car. But all that power is smooth and silent, with no gear-shifting and no roaring engine. So why an EV — electric vehicle — for the VW entry? For starters, it reinforces the VW push for more electric innovation as part of its global strategy. And, says Dumas, the EV itself is a good match for the mountain’s challenge because “the power remains constant.” Combustion-powered vehicles, he says, “lose a significant amount of power in the thin mountain air” — and a win “would be a stunning achievement on first attempt; it would amount to averaging about 83 mph all the way to the mountain’s summit.” On the course, the I.D. R reflects race-specific needs with advanced tech. The I.D. R’s 40 kWh lithium-ion battery was engineered to be light as well as powerful and to maintain its power output throughout the run. The battery also had to be fast-charging since races can be cancelled due to bad weather and restarted again from the bottom of the course as soon as 30 minutes later. To further reduce the weight of the battery and improve performance, the I.D. R’s brakes are designed to generate approximately 20 percent of the energy needed to run the race. All these factors are just as critical to the capacity, range, performance, and convenience of EVs designed for consumer use. And there was one last noteable achievement: VW mechanics, engineers, and designers had just 250 days from the beginning of the Pikes Peak project to race day to develop the record-ready vehicle. About the Course The course demands versatility from the car and from the driver. “You need the precision of a circuit racer combined with the fearlessness and improvisational talent of a rally driver,” says Dumas. The Pikes Peak course includes three sections, each with their own technical and driving trials: The start, says Dumas, where “there are still trees by the side of the road . . .  medium-fast corners await here, which must be taken at approximately 150 or 160 km/h [roughly 95–100 mph].” The middle section consists almost solely of hairpins; the speed here is relatively low, says Dumas. “The final section looks like the surface of the moon — just rocks, no trees . . .no tangible reference points for the course; many of the corners are blind. At the same time, the speed is high. This section of the course is the most difficult and commands the most respect from the driver,” says Dumas. In order to win, you need a car that works well in all three sections,” says Dumas. Setting a new record was a win for Volkswagen and for electric mobility.  That’s because the same innovations that make an electric race car competitive in the world’s most famous hill climb provide important lessons for the development of electric consumer cars as well. “Motorsports greatly accelerated technical innovation in the early days of the automobile,” says Jost Capito, Managing Director of Volkswagen R. “It will continue to play a similar role in the development of powerful electric cars in the future.”  The future that Capito speaks of? It’s almost here: Volkswagen’s I.D. series of electric vehicle concepts are tentatively set to enter production within the next couple of years. of

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